Chicago Med (S02E13): “Theseus’ Ship”

“Theseus’s Ship” was a gentle, but powerful episode of Chicago Med that questioned challenging questions such as, at what age can a child decide his medical treatment?

Faced with an eight year old cancer patient who had convinced his dad to allow him to stop his medication three months prior, Dr. Manning is initially outraged with the parent – as are most of the doctors. Towards the middle of the episode, when Manning finally sits down with the patient, it becomes clear this child is completely aware of his decisions and is in fact capable of making accurate and mature decisions for his life. I found this patient interesting and different than many others on the show because it tested our beliefs and the legal rights of children patients.

The Med writers clearly hint at a Halstead-Manning relationship in “Theseus’s Ship.” When Halstead’s girlfriend starts asking questions, we get the sense their relationship isn’t stable. At this point, it’s just a waiting game. I hope the writer’s get them back together, but I don’t want it to be clique or rushed.

Dr. Reese’s continued character development – mostly in terms of her confidence in her work ability – has been a pleasure to watch. While at times it can feel repetitive (her not believing she is a suitable doctor for her particular job), her ability to come to terms with treating such an out-of-the-box patient declared her status in the workforce. I do hope we get to see her with her therapist more, and truly understand what her “problems” are.

I can’t talk about this episode without highlighting the end scene between Dr. Charles and his daughter. I have always been intrigued by this relationship, and it is so fulfilling to see Dr. Charles open up to his daughter. I hope we see more of this.

Overall Rating: A

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